Home > Emotional Intelligence & Building Stronger Relationships

Emotional Intelligence & Building Stronger Relationships

One of many effective coaching attributes is the ability to develop a strong coach-athlete relationship. By building your emotional intelligence to develop intrapersonal and interpersonal skills, you are taking steps towards building stronger relationships with those around you including your fellow colleagues, and most importantly, your performing athletes. But what exactly is EI, and how can you harness the power of it to your advantage?

Strong Emotional Intelligence can help you:

  • Relieve stress
  • Communicate effectively
  • Empathize with others
  • Overcome challenges
  • Defuse conflict

    While Emotional Intelligence may sometimes seem like a kind of Jedi mind trick from Star Wars, rest assured this webinar will guide you in understanding EI, how to use specific tools and strategies, and unleash the “force” in your coaching role. Specific emphasis will be placed on team dynamics and coaching staff dynamics.

Date: February 24, 2021
Time: 7 – 8pm EST
Cost: FREE
PD Point: 1 PD Point

See what Coach-2-Coach is all about!

Coach Responses

How important to performance is relationship building amongst your athletes? What can you do to promote relationship building within your coaching team or staff?

What advice/techniques would you give to new coaches?

Share your tips and best practices!

See past Coach 2 Coach topics.

Dawn Turner – Diving – Ottawa

Tough during a virtual world at the moment but building strong relationships on and off the course by being interested in other activities as a team. Go out for hikes, do crafts, recommend a movie, study groups. Just being together encourages a stronger team atmosphere.

Sophie Anderson – Soccer – Ottawa

Talk a bit more about roles and open up on strengths and weaknesses (building greater trust between coaches and getting comfortable with our vulnerability).

Elliott Rae – Multi-Sport – Toronto

I can promote a stronger relationship with my coaching staff through providing a better environment. If I were to allow myself to be vulnerable with my staff, I believe I could foster a healthier relationship with them. Another action that I could do with my coaching staff is unite the values, ambitious, workload, and ideas.

Dorothy Penner – Orienteering – Edmonton

Our coaching team is a very small, close knit group of volunteers. We have a great relationship currently but want to ensure that this can carry on as we introduce new coaches to our group. Staying in touch and doing activities together would be our biggest relationship promoters.

Glen Powney – Hockey – LaSalle

Delegate certain responsibilities to each Staff member; use their expertise and make them feel valuable. Listen to their ideas as well.

Chris Cook – Rugby – Brockville

Listening, listening, listening! This is the essential piece for connecting and implementing a program that is inclusive and responsive to everyone’s needs.

Norman Clarke – Basketball – Toronto

Have more time together away from the actual coaching. More opportunities for coaching staff to take the leadership role.

Sign up to receive Coach 2 Coach webinar updates monthly!

Home > Overtraining After A Layoff: How You Can Help Your Athletes Avoid It

Overtraining After A Layoff: How You Can Help Your Athletes Avoid It

Returning to the playing field after a layoff, whether from injury, a facility closure or a cancelled season can be a challenge for any athlete. Understandably, many athletes want to jump right in and get back to work. However, it is important to remember that it takes time to regain the same level of fitness and performance that they enjoyed before their hiatus. Trying to do too much, too quickly can result in undue emotional, mental and physical stress, and potentially injury.

In this webinar, Sylvie Tetrault (Sports Nutrition, Strength and Conditioning – Gary Roberts High Performance Training) will explore how coaches can help their athletes return to sport safely by looking at:

  • What is stress and why is it important to understand?
  • Understanding stress and the Nervous System (Autonomic NS- Sympathetic vs. ParasympatheticStress and the impact on training
  • Stress and the immune system
  • Boosting the immune system through nutrition and lifestyle strategies
  • Stress resilience techniques
Join the Community

See what Coach-2-Coach is all about!

Coach Responses

What are the biggest challenges in preparing your athlete(s) to return to training after a layoff?

What advice/techniques would you give to new coaches?

Share your tips and best practices!

Nadine Powell – Richmond HillSoccer

“Figuring out the proper loads and ensuring they are kept safe and injury-free. An added challenge is dealing with parents who always think intense is better. They don’t understand the demands on athletes and the potential for harm.”

Brian Stittle – Brampton – Hockey

“The need for a step-by-step approach to returning and the recognition that things won’t be the same as they were prior to the disruption.”

Gina Bin – Mississauga – Rowing

“Athletes are dealing with a new reality at this point, and the challenge is motivating our athletes to step into this new reality which for the right now includes training at home on their own. The challenge is to motivate the athletes to move into their training with confidence. We need to talk about their emotional well being especially with the isolation of training, not being able to train with their peers, have their coaches on hand to teach skills and correct techniques. It is more difficult for some to get up and get to the training if they do not have coaches and peers on hand to motivate them. Many have great aspirations for national teams, and the challenge to train with the intensity that they need can be scary at this time.”

Shannon Sandford – Bolton – Gymnastics

“Mental and physical stress of wanting to jump back into training. Making the athlete understand that this could result in an injury and set them back even more can be challenging.”

Claudio Berto – Calgary – Alpine Ski

“Trying to help athletes to understand that it takes time to improve and some just want to find short cuts.”

Scott Rye – Peter – Hockey

“The approach to build from basics again. Normally, they want to jump right in at the last spot/exercises.”

See past Coach 2 Coach topics.

Sign up to receive Coach 2 Coach webinar updates monthly!

Home > CAO & Hydro One team up to provide new safety resources

CAO & Hydro One team up to provide new safety resources

90 per cent of Canadians believe sport will play a key role in helping society rebuild and recover from the COVID-19 pandemic.

In a recent Abacus Data survey, 90 per cent of Canadians said they believe sport will play a key role in helping society to rebuild and recover from the COVID-19 pandemic. Sport and recreation allow for the creation of strong social bonds and foster a sense of community, both of which have been challenged during these past months.

With the pandemic challenging the way we play sport, coaches and leaders will need the right resources to ensure athletes can continue to train at home and return to sport safely. To support the new ways coaches are navigating sport, Hydro One and the Coaches Association of Ontario (CAO) have developed Safe Sport 101, a new virtual hub that provides coaches with the tools to keep sport safe, fun and inclusive for all participants. The hub has resources to both support in-person activities when they are deemed safe and to empower coaches with tips and resources to coach virtually.

“We need coaches to have the resources necessary to continue supporting athletes and participants as they navigate this challenging time,” said Jeremy Cross, CAO Executive Director. “This partnership with Hydro One provides coaches with the tools they need to be there for their community throughout the pandemic and moving forward, while keeping safety top of mind.”

“Coaches play an important role in facilitating programs for youth that enhance their physical and mental well-being while keeping them socially connected which is particularly important during this challenging time,” said Jay Armitage, Vice President of Marketing and Communications, Hydro One. “We have a responsibility to support community resilience across the province, and are proud to partner with the Coaches Association of Ontario to develop new online safety resources for coaches at a time when they are needed most.”  

Coaches and leaders need to be equipped with the right knowledge to create a safe environment for athletes, following the advice of local public health units. Through Safe Sport 101, whether virtually or in-person, coaches have additional tools to support physical and emotional safety for athletes across the province.

Four tips for coaches navigating this time:

  1. Review safety protocols
    When your sport gets the green light, the first step is to ensure you are up to date with the relevant return to play protocols. Coaches should have updated emergency action plans, contact tracing trackers and health questionnaires readily available during all sessions. Free templates are available here. Depending on local circumstances, in-person activities may not be possible. Find the resources to support virtual coaching here.
  2. Easing back into training
    When your sport gets the green light, the first step is to ensure you are up to date with the relevant return to play protocols. Coaches should have updated emergency action plans, contact tracing trackers and health questionnaires readily available during all sessions. Free templates are available here. Depending on local circumstances, in-person activities may not be possible. Find the resources to support virtual coaching here.
  3. Support your athlete’s mental health
    When an athlete is in distress, they may turn to their coach for support. Be a positive role model and build mental health and emotional safety into regular daily conversations with your athletes. Understand that each athlete is unique and support can look different from one person to another.
  4. Keep the lines of communication open
    Keep in touch regularly with your athletes and guardians about the new safety protocols that have been implemented and why they are important. Additionally, work together to set new targets and goals for the year that take into account returning after time away from the sport.

Prioritizing safety requires careful planning and implementation to enhance the overall sport experience for all. Coaches can find more safety tips at https://safesport101.coachesontario.ca/ to find the tools and resources to keep sport safe, positive and fun. 

Giving coaches tools they need to make sport safe for all